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Maryville College Theatre Department to present “Lysistrata”

The Maryville College Calyton Center will be hosting “Lysistrata” April 27-29 and April 30. Image by Brandi Payne.

The Maryville College Calyton Center will be hosting “Lysistrata” April 27-29 and April 30. Image by Brandi Payne.

The Maryville College Theatre Department will be showing an adaptation of Aristophanes’ Greek play, “Lysistrata,” on April 27-30.

The production will be shown in Clayton Center for the Arts’ Haslam Family Flexible Theatre on Thurs., April 27 at 8 p.m.; Fri., April 28 at 8 p.m.; Sat., April 29 at 8 p.m. and Sun., April 30 at 2 p.m.

Admission for Maryville College students, faculty and staff are free, but tickets are required for entry. For everyone else, admission is $10 for adults and $7 for senior adults ages 60 and up. This play is meant for mature audiences due to sexual references and crude humor.

“Lysistrata” is a Greek comedy that centers on the women of Greece who embark on a sex strike during a huge war where the men refuse to negotiate peace. The main character, named Lysistrata, convinces her fellow women to refuse to have sex with their husbands in order to make them end the war.

“The most challenging thing about bringing this script to life was trying to understand the context of the time period,” said freshman cast member Bailee Burleson. “Athenians and Spartans are in an all-out war, and you have to make sure you act like that. Even though most of the lines seem benevolent, you have to keep in mind the subtext of the line, as well as your relationship to each character.”

The play is adapted by Ellen McLaughlin, an American playwright and actor. She is heavily influenced by Greek theatre.

“Ellen McLaughlin’s modern adaptation highlights the lasting relevance of the play,” said junior cast member Jenna Hunt. “This production seeks to further highlight that relevance through costumes, makeup, sound and more.  At the same time, we’re attempting to stay true to some traditional Greek elements.  For instance, you might see a traditional ancient Greek toga paired with Converse or Forever 21-esque gladiator sandals.  It’s an interesting mix!”

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